About Idaho Wild Sheep

The Mission

The mission of Idaho Wild Sheep is to enhance wild sheep populations in Idaho, and with partners in adjacent states, for public enjoyment, education, and fair chase hunting; to promote professional wildlife management, and protect sportsmen's rights.

 

History

The Idaho Wild Sheep was founded in 1982 by two dozen concerned sportsmen who wanted to “put more bighorns on Idaho’s mountains”.

From that core group, many of which are still very active on our board and committees, we have grown to a thriving organization with over 400 committed members.

Media Release
Idaho Wild Sheep Foundation
For Immediate Release
July 26, 2017
For More Information Contact Teri Ottens
208-345-6171
208-869-6832

25th Annual Big Horn Sheep Lottery Tag Drawn

The Idaho Wild Sheep Foundation held the 25th Annual Big Horn Sheep tag lottery drawing today at the Idaho Fish and Game Headquarters, and there is a happy winner of a hunt of a lifetime – John M. Taylor of Arroyo Grande, California. Two alternates were also drawn in case Mr. Taylor is unable to make the hunt. The winning ticket this year was drawn by Nicole Bilodeau. Nicole is a graduate student doing her thesis on big horn sheep and has been working with the Idaho Fish and Game on sheep counts in Idaho. The lottery for this big horn sheep tag has raised over $1.6 million dollars for wild sheep in Idaho over the past 25 years.

The Idaho Wild Sheep Foundation has been hosting this lottery since 1992 with the proceeds going back to the IDFG to go towards Big Horn sheep research and habitat development. This year the lottery raised $83,135  that will be spent towards the benefit and enhancement of big horn sheep in Idaho. 
The Idaho Wild Sheep Foundation is a non-profit organization formed to enhance wild sheep populations in Idaho, and with partners in adjacent states, for public enjoyment, education, and fair chase hunting; to promote professional wildlife management, and protect sportsmen's rights. The Idaho Wild Sheep was founded in 1982 by two dozen concerned sportsmen who wanted to “put more bighorns on Idaho’s mountains”. From that core group, many of which are still very active on the board and committees, the organization has grown to a thriving group with over 300 committed members. 
For more information please contact the Idaho WSF office at 208-345-6171.
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Fish and Game Hollie and Nicole


Grad Student N. Bilodeau draws ticket


President Z. Higgins makes phone call

 

The Idaho Wild Sheep Foundation is involved in a number of activities, programs and issues dealing with bighorn sheep in the state of Idaho. The money raised during our banquet is used for operations, addressing pertinent bighorn conservation issues working on special projects, fighting political threats and keeping you our supporters informed and engaged. The links in the left margin of our home page highlights a few of the issues and programs IWSF has been involved with recently.

Funding, Sponsors and Donors

Funding for the Idaho Wild Sheep Foundation

Like any other non-profit 501-3-C organization, IWSF relies on revenues either raised at annual fund raising events and/or donations from individual sponsors or donors. That is the sum extent of monies the IWSF has to operate on annually; we do not have endowments or benefactors that augment or supplement our annual fund raising event.

Whether you are a sportsman, hunter or a wildlife advocate that believes strongly the bighorn resource of Idaho should be a sustained, preserved and increased for future generations, we need your support. At the close of every year, non-profit organizations, such as IWSF ask for donations which may help provide a business or individual relief to taxable income. If you are invested in Idaho and our wildlife resources, please consider a donation or include IWSF in your estate planning. Your gifts will truly be a reinvestment in a species that has occupied the mountains and canyon lands of Idaho for over 18,000 years. Bighorn sheep are survivors as evidenced by the fact animals like the Wooly Mammoths disappear from our landscape over 10,000 years ago. They survived very well until European man appeared with their associated impacts. This resource is in trouble and needs our help. Please contact our office if you have questions or would like help.

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